VMware

VMware Server Beta 3 Release Notes

What's in These Release Notes

Build 23869 is a beta 3 build of VMware Server. The release notes cover the following topics:

What's New in this Release

VMware Server beta 3 is an update to VMware Server beta 2. The beta 3 version includes support for taking and reverting to snapshots in the background. VMware Server beta 3 also includes experimental support for running both the 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Sun Solaris 10, including update 1 and update 2 beta, as guest operating systems. See the VMware Server documentation manuals for more information. In addition, the beta 3 version includes the VMware Virtual Machine Importer version 1.5, which lets you import virtual machines from Microsoft Virtual Server and Virtual PC as well as Symantec LiveState recovery system images. To access the VMware Virtual Machine Importer from the VMware Server Console, choose either File > Import or File > Open. You can access the VMware Virtual Machine Importer only from the host machine. For more detailed information about how to use the VMware Virtual Machine Importer, see the VMware Virtual Machine Importer User's Manual.
Beginning with beta 3, the master installer for VMware Server also includes the VMware DiskMount Utility, which lets you mount a Microsoft Windows host file system as a separate drive without connecting to the virtual disk from within a virtual machine. For more information about how to use the DiskMount Utility, see the VMware Server Administration Guide.

VMware Server beta 2 introduced support for using the VMware Server Console to connect to and configure GSX Server 3 hosts as well as to run virtual machines on GSX Server 3 hosts. VMware Server beta 2 also introduced support for using and upgrading legacy virtual machines. VMware Server beta 3 also includes the VMware Server C API Technology Preview, introduced with VMware Server beta 2. The Server C API is installed on a Windows host when you perform a complete installation using the master installer or on a Linux host when you install the server software. VMware Server continues to support the VMware Scripting APIs, which include the vmCOM API (Windows hosts only) and the vmPerl API. You can also install any of the scripting APIs, which are available on the VMware Web site, on any client machine. For more information about the VMware Server C API Technology Preview, see the documentation for the Server C API on the VMware Web site at http://www.vmware.com/support/pubs/server_pubs

In addition, review the Resolved Issues and Known Issues sections for additional information about what has changed since the beta 1 and beta 2 releases.

Before You Get Started

Installing on a Computer with a Different VMware Product
The only VMware products that can be installed on the same host as VMware Server are the VMware VirtualCenter client software and the Virtual Machine Console for GSX Server 3. You cannot have any version of GSX Server installed on a host with VMware Server. If you have any other VMware product installed on the computer where you plan to install VMware Server, remove the existing product before you install VMware Server. On a Windows host, use the Add/Remove Programs control panel. On a Linux host, see your product manual for the commands needed to uninstall the product.

In this release, VMware Server does not include support for using VirtualCenter to manage your virtual machines.

Creating Virtual Machines
You can create new virtual machines in VMware Server. VMware Server creates virtual machines that are compatible with VMware Workstation 5.x.

Note: When you create a new virtual machine, the wizard offers options for 64-bit versions of some guest operating systems. To determine whether your host computer can host a 64-bit guest, see VMware knowledge base article 1901.

With this release, to use sound in a 64-bit Windows guest operating system, you must use the driver available on the VMware Web site at www.vmware.com/download/ws/#drivers under VMaudio Driver (experimental).

Note: You must use the VMware Server Console to create and configure virtual machines. You cannot create and configure virtual machines using the VMware Management Interface.

For notes on installing specific guest operating systems, see the Guest Operating System Installation Guide. VMware Server supports all guest operating systems supported by VMware Workstation 5.5. You can also use virtual appliances downloaded from the VMware Technology Network Virtual Machine Center.

Install VMware Tools
Be sure to install VMware Tools (VM > Install VMware Tools) in the virtual machine.

Installing the Beta 3 Version

Getting started with VMware Server is simple. The key steps are

  1. Install the VMware Server software (including the server, VMware Server Console, VMware Management Interface, the Server C API, the VmCOM API, and the VmPerl API on the server.)

  2. Install the VMware Server Console and VMware Scripting APIs on Windows or Linux clients.

  3. Note: If you have a beta 1 or beta 2 version of VMware Server installed on a host running Microsoft Windows, the VMware Server master installer automatically uninstalls the existing version of VMware Server and installs the current beta 3 version. To install VMware Server beta 3 on a Linux host running a beta 1 or beta 2 version of VMware Server, see Installing VMware Server on a Linux Host.

  4. Start the VMware Server Console and enter your serial number. You need to do this only once — either during installation or the first time you start a console after you install VMware Server.

    Note: You receive the serial numbers in an email message from VMware. The message includes one serial number for use on Windows hosts and another serial number for use on Linux hosts. Be sure to enter the serial number that is appropriate for your host operating system. If you need to download the software again or request additional serial numbers, go to www.vmware.com/download/server/.

  5. Create a virtual machine using the New Virtual Machine Wizard.

  6. Power on the virtual machine and install a guest operating system. You need the installation media (CD-ROM or floppy disks) for your guest operating system.

  7. Install the VMware Tools package in your virtual machine.

  8. Install software in your virtual machine.

  9. Start using your virtual machine. Use the VMware Server Console, VMware Management Interface, and VMware Scripting APIs to manage your server host and virtual machines.

About the VMware Server Console on the Server

Use the VMware Server Console to manage virtual machines both locally and remotely that were created using VMware Server as well as to connect to virtual machines running on a GSX Server 3 host. You must, however, use the VMware Virtual Machine Console to connect to virtual machines running on ESX Server or GSX Server 2.

Multiple consoles can connect to a virtual machine at the same time, giving multiple authorized users concurrent access to the virtual machine. Similarly, multiple users can connect to the virtual machine with VMware Scripting APIs and the VMware Management Interface. You can run virtual machines in full screen mode from any console.

When you install the VMware Server software on a Windows host, the VMware Server Console is installed automatically. If you are using a Linux host, follow the instructions below to install the console. You should also install the VMware Server Console on any client workstation from which you want to access virtual machines. This allows for remote management of virtual machines.


Installing VMware Server on a Windows Host

To install the VMware Server software on a Windows host:

  1. Log on to your Microsoft Windows host as the Administrator user or as a user who is a member of the Windows Administrators group.

    Note: On a Windows Server 2003 host, you must be logged on as a local administrator (that is, not logged on to the domain) in order to install VMware Server.

    Although you must be logged on as an administrator to install VMware Server, you can run the program after it is installed as a user with normal user privileges.

    Note: A message appears if you are installing VMware Server on a Windows host configured as an Active Directory server. You can safely ignore the message by clicking OK to continue the installation, or choose to cancel the installation.

  2. Start the VMware Server master installer.

    From the Start menu, choose Run, browse to the directory where you saved the downloaded installer file (the name is similar to VMware-server-installer-<xxxx>.exe, where <xxxx> is a series of numbers representing the version and build numbers).

    Click on .exe

    Click Open, and then click OK.

    The master installer starts.

    Click Next.

  3. Accept the end user license agreement (EULA).

    Select the I accept the terms in the license agreement option, and click Next.

  4. Choose whether to perform a complete or a custom installation.

    Complete Installation

    A complete installation installs the server software, the VMware Management Interface, the VMware Server Console, Server C API, the VmCOM API, and the VmPerl API on the VMware Server host. To choose the complete installation, select Complete, and click Next.

    To install all the VMware Server components in a directory other than the default, click Change, and browse to the directory of your choice. If the directory does not exist, the installer creates it for you.

    Caution: VMware Server must be installed on a local drive, not a network drive.

    Note: Windows and the Microsoft Installer limit the length of a path to a folder to 255 characters for a path to a folder on a local drive and 240 characters for a path to a folder on a mapped or shared drive. If the path to the VMware Server program folder exceeds this limit, an error message appears. You must select or enter a shorter path.

    When you are ready to continue, click Next and go to step 6.

    Custom Installation

    A custom installation lets you pick and choose which components to install. You can run the installer again at a later date to install components you did not install the first time. Select Custom and click Next. The Custom Setup screen appears.

    In the Custom Setup screen, choose the components to install. Click the arrow to the left of the component you do not want to install and select the appropriate option from the menu.

    To determine how much free space is on your host, click Space. This is useful if you are choosing a custom installation because of limited disk space on your host.

    To install all the VMware Server components in a directory other than the default, click Browse and select the directory. If the directory does not exist, the installer creates it for you.

    Caution: VMware Server must be installed on a local drive, not a network drive.

    Note: Windows and the Microsoft Installer limit the length of a path to a folder to 255 characters for a path to a folder on a local drive, and 240 characters for a path to a folder on a mapped or shared drive. If the path to the VMware Server program folder exceeds this limit, an error message appears. You must select or enter a shorter path.

    When you are ready to continue, click Next.

  5. If the installer detects that the CD-ROM autorun feature is enabled, you see a message that gives you the option to disable this feature. Disabling it prevents undesirable interactions with the virtual machines you install on this system.

  6. To change any settings or information you provided, click Back until you reach the screen containing the information you want to change.

    Otherwise, click Install. The installer begins copying files to your host.

  7. A shortcut for the VMware Server Console is created for you on your desktop. This shortcut gives you easy access to virtual machines from the desktop of your host.

  8. Click Finish. The VMware Server software is installed.

  9. If you see a prompt that suggests you reboot your server, do so now to allow VMware Server to complete the installation process.


Installing VMware Server on a Linux Host

Before you install and run VMware Server, check the following notes and make any necessary adjustments to the configuration of your host operating system.

  • The real-time clock function must be compiled into your Linux kernel.

  • VMware Server for Linux systems requires that the parallel port PC-style hardware option (CONFIG_PARPORT_PC) be built and loaded as a kernel module (that is, it must be set to m when the kernel is compiled).

  • SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8 hosts: The gcc package must be installed on your host before you install VMware Server. See Before You Install on a SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 8 Host.

  • Turbolinux Enterprise Server 8 hosts: The inetd process must be configured to start when the host operating system boots. See Before You Install on a Turbolinux Enterprise Server 8 Host.

Caution: Some operating systems, such as Red Hat Linux 7.2 and 7.3, include a firewall by default. This firewall prevents access from the VMware Server Console and the VMware Management Interface on client computers to the VMware Server host. For the VMware Server Console to connect to the host, you need to open up port 902. To connect to the host with the VMware Management Interface, you need to open up port 8333 (and port 8222 if you plan to disable SSL for the management interface).

On the Server

You can install up to three software packages on the Linux server:

  • The VMware Server package for the server. The RPM file is called VMware-server-<xxxx>.i386.rpm while the tar archive is called VMware-server-<xxxx>.tar.gz, where <xxxx> is a series of numbers representing the version and build numbers.

    Note: The VmPerl API and Server C packages are installed when you install the server software. The VmPerl API is a scripting tool that uses Perl to manage virtual machines remotely; The VMware Server C API Preview Technology supports clients written in C. For more information, go to www.vmware.com/support/developer.

  • The VMware Management Interface package. This tar archive is called VMware-mui-<xxxx>.tar.gz.

  • The VMware Server Console package (which you download from the VMware Management Interface). This package is also available from the VMware Web site as an RPM file or tar archive in a client GZip file that also contains the VmPerl API. The RPM file is called VMware-server-console-<xxxx>.i386.rpm, while the tar archive is called VMware-server-console-<xxxx>.tar.gz.

In most cases, you work directly at the server when you install the server software. You can manage and run virtual machines from the server or from any client.

On a Client Workstation

In addition to a Web browser, you can install the following packages on a client:

  • The VMware Server Console.

  • The VmPerl, Server C, and VmCOM Scripting APIs (the VmCOM API can be installed only on a Windows client); for more information, go to www.vmware.com/support/developer.

The VMware Server Console package is available in the VMware Management Interface. The VmPerl and VmCom Scripting APIs are available from www.vmware.com/download/server/

Installation Steps

The steps below describe an installation on a Red Hat Linux host. You start from the directory where you saved the downloaded installer file. If you are using a different Linux distribution, some of the commands might be different.

Before you install the VMware Server software, ensure your Linux distribution is for a server, not a workstation. If you are running a workstation distribution, you need to install the inetd process to connect to the VMware Server Console and VMware Management Interface.

  1. Log on to your Linux host with the user name you plan to use when running VMware Server.

  2. In a terminal window, become root so you can perform the initial installation.
    su -

  3. Change to the directory where you saved the installer file.

  4. Do one of the following:

    • Use the RPM installer: Run RPM specifying the installation file.
      rpm -Uhv VMware-server-<xxxx>.i386.rpm
      (VMware-server-<xxxx>.i386.rpm is the installation file, where <xxxx> is a series of numbers representing version and build numbers.)

    • Use the tar installer: Complete the following steps.

      1. Unpack the tar archive.
        tar zxf VMware-server-<xxxx>.tar.gz

      2. Change to the installation directory.
        cd vmware-server-distrib

      3. Run the installation program.
        ./vmware-install.pl

      4. Accept the default directories for the binary files, daemon files, library files, manual files, documentation files, init directories and init scripts.


  5. Run the configuration program.
    vmware-config.pl

    Note: If you use the RPM installer, you need to run this program separately from the command line. If you install from the tar archive, the installer offers to launch the configuration program for you. Answer Yes when you see the prompt.

    Note: If you are installing VMware Server on a Mandrake Linux host, the configuration program asks for the location of lspci. When that prompt appears, enter the following path:
    /usr/bin/lspcidrake

    Use vmware-config.pl to reconfigure VMware Server whenever you upgrade your kernel. It is not necessary to reinstall VMware Server after you upgrade your kernel.

    You can also use vmware-config.pl to reconfigure the networking options for VMware Server — for example, to add or remove host-only networks.

  6. Press Enter to read the end user license agreement (EULA). You can page through it by pressing the space bar. If the Do you accept prompt doesn't appear, press Q to get to the next prompt.

  7. Configure networking for your virtual machines.

    • To use any type of networking with virtual machines, answer Yes to this prompt: Do you want networking for your virtual machines?

      Bridged networking is always enabled if you enable networking.

    • To enable NAT, answer Yes to the following prompts:
      Do you want to be able to use NAT networking in your virtual machines?
      Do you want this script to probe for an unused private subnet?

      This allows you to connect your virtual machines to an external network when you have only one IP network address on the physical network, and that address is used by the host computer.

    • To enable host-only networking, answer Yes to the following prompts:
      Do you want to be able to use host-only networking in your virtual machines?
      Do you want this script to probe for an unused private subnet?

      Host-only networking allows for networking between the virtual machine and the host operating system.

  8. Specify the port the VMware Server Console uses when connecting to the VMware Server host remotely. Port 902 is the default port. If your site uses this port for another application — for example, ideafarm-chat uses this port — then specify a different port for the console to use here.

  9. Specify the directory where you want to store your virtual machine files. By default, this directory is /var/lib/vmware/Virtual Machines. Make sure this location is on a large enough file system to contain the files, as the virtual disk files for each virtual machine are usually gigabytes in size.

  10. Enter your VMware Server serial number exactly as it appears (with hyphens) in the email message you received from VMware. When you enter the serial number, it is saved in your license file.

  11. The configuration program displays a message saying the configuration completed successfully. If it does not display this message, run the configuration program again.

  12. When you finish, do one of the following:

    • Log off of the root account.
      exit

    • Install the VMware Management Interface following the instructions below.

    • Install the VMware Server Console following the instructions below.


Installing the VMware Management Interface on a Linux Host

The steps below describe an installation of the VMware Management Interface on a Red Hat Linux host. You start from the directory where you saved the installer file you downloaded. If you are using a different Linux distribution, some commands might be different.

Note: You must first install the libdb.so.3 library from your Linux CD-ROM.

  1. In a terminal window, if you haven't done so already, become root so you can carry out the installation.
    su -

  2. Change to the directory where you saved the installer file.

    Caution: Make sure the directory to which you plan to untar the tar archive does not contain any files from a previous management interface tar installation — for example, from a previous installation of VMware GSX Server.

  3. Unpack the archive.
    tar zxf VMware-mui-<xxxx>.tar.gz
    (where <xxxx> is a series of numbers representing version and build numbers)

  4. Change to the installation directory.
    cd vmware-mui-distrib

  5. Run the installation program.
    ./vmware-install.pl

  6. Press Enter to continue.

  7. Accept the EULA.

  8. Specify the directory where you want to install the management components, the binary files, management interface files, init directories, and init scripts. Or accept the default directories.

  9. Allow the configuration program vmware-config-mui.pl to run.

  10. Specify the number of minutes before a management interface session times out. The default session length is 60 minutes.

  11. When you finish, you can:

    • Log off of the root account.
      exit

    • Install the VMware Server Console following the instructions below.


Installing the VMware Server Console on a Linux Host

The steps below describe an installation of the VMware Server Console on a Red Hat Linux host. You start from the directory where you saved the installer file you downloaded. If you are using a different Linux distribution, some commands may be different.

You can download the VMware Server Console installer from the VMware Management Interface. You can run this console on the VMware Server host or any Linux client.

  1. In a terminal window, if you have not done so already, become root so you can carry out the installation steps.
    su -

  2. Change to the directory where you saved the installer file.

  3. If you downloaded the console package from the download page, unzip the client installer archive to /tmp.
    unzip VMware-server-linux-client-<xxxx>.zip -d /tmp
    (where <xxxx> is a series of numbers representing the version and build numbers)

    Caution: If you intend to install the VMware Server Console from a tar package, make sure the directory to which you plan to untar the tar archive does not contain any files from a previous console tar installation — for example, from a previous installation of VMware GSX Server.

  4. Change to the /tmp directory.
    cd /tmp

  5. Do one of the following:

    • Use the RPM installer. Run RPM specifying the installation file.
      rpm -Uhv VMware-server-console-<xxxx>.i386.rpm
      (where <xxxx> is a series of numbers representing the version and build numbers)

    • Use the tar installer. Complete the following steps.

      1. Copy the tar archive to the /tmp directory.

      2. Unpack the archive.
        tar zxf VMware-server-console-<xxxx>.tar.gz
        (where <xxxx> is a series of numbers representing the version and build numbers)

        The archive unpacks to vmware-server-console-distrib.

      3. Run the installer.
        cd vmware-server-console-distrib
        ./vmware-install.pl

      4. Accept the EULA and answer the questions specifying default directories for the binary files, library files, manual files, and documentation files.

      5. If the Do you accept prompt doesn't appear, press Q to continue.

  6. Run the configuration program vmware-server-config-console.pl.

    Note: If you use the RPM installer, you need to run this program separately from the command line. If you install from the tar archive, the installer offers to launch the configuration program for you. Answer Yes when you see the prompt.

    You see the following prompt: What port do you want the remote console to use to connect to server. [902]

    If you specified a different port number when you installed the server software, enter that port number here. Otherwise, keep the default of 902.

  7. When you finish, log off of the root account.
    exit

Technical Reference

See the VMware Server Administration Guide for more detailed information about how to configure and manage VMware Server and the VMware Server Virtual Machine Guide for more information about how to create and manage virtual machines on VMware Server.

Issues Resolved in VMware Server

Issues resolved in VMware Server beta 1 build 22088

Virtual SMP virtual machines suspend automatically after 24 hours.
In beta release build 20925, VMware Server automatically suspends a virtual machine configured to use Virtual SMP after 24 hours of continuous operation. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta build 22088.

Virtual machine might fail to power on when debugging is enabled.
In beta release build 20925, your virtual machine might fail to power on, and VMware Server displays the error message: "Operation failed to change the VM to the expected power state." To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta build 22088.

Unable to create new virtual machine over SSL connection.
In beta release build 20925, attempts to create a new virtual machine over an SSL connection might fail. By default, the VMware Server Console connects to the VMware Server host using SSL. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta build 22088.

"Socket issue" reported when attempting to create virtual machine.
In beta release build 20925, VMware Server sometimes fails to create a new virtual machine and displays the error message: "An operation was attempted on something that is not a socket." To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta build 22088.

Issues resolved in VMware Server beta 2 build 22874

VMware Management Interface might return to login page unexpectedly.
In beta 1 releases, when you click the Standard Options link in the VMware Management Interface, the login page might appear, instead. This issue occurs on both Windows and Linux hosts. To correct this issue for Windows hosts only, upgrade to VMware Server beta 2 build 22874. The issue remains on Linux hosts.

Do not create virtual machine using a partition as a physical disk.
In beta 1 releases, you should not attempt to create a virtual machine that uses a partition on the host as a physical disk. The virtual machine is not created correctly. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 2 build 22874. Only a root user or administrator has permission to perform this action.

Do not rely on SSL on an unsecure network.
The beta 1 releases include OpenSSL libraries with denial of service vulnerabilities documented in CAN-2004-0079, CAN-2004-0112, and CAN-2004-0081. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 2 build 22874, which includes updated OpenSSL libraries from version 0.9.7i that correct these vulnerabilities.

Do not use parentheses in the name of a virtual disk.
In the beta 1 releases, you cannot add a virtual disk to a virtual machine if the name of the disk file includes parentheses. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 2 build 22874.

When you shrink a virtual disk, the progress bar does not appear.
In beta 1 releases, when you use VMware Tools to shrink a virtual machine's virtual disk, the progress bar does not appear. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 2 build 22874.

Some hints continue to appear after you attempt to turn them off.
In the beta 1 releases, some hints continue to appear even if you select the Never show this hint again option. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta build 2 build 22874.

Connect with console to dismiss some hint messages reported in VMware Management Interface.
In the beta 1 releases, when you power on a virtual machine from the VMware Management Interface and the virtual machine displays a hint that requires a response, you might be unable to respond to the hint in the management interface. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 2 build 22874.

Creating a virtual machine occasionally fails with invalid handle message.
In the beta 1 releases, if you attempt to create a virtual machine using the VMware Server Console to connect to a remote host, the process might fail with the message: "The handle is invalid." To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 2 build 22874.

Error message might appear after check for updates.
In the beta 1 releases, when you check for product updates on the Web (Help > Check for Updates on the Web), you might encounter an error if you choose the menu item a second time before the dialog box appears. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 2 build 22874.

Check for updates dialog box shows incorrect information about previous check.
In the beta 1 releases, when you check for product updates on the Web (Help > Check for Updates on the Web), the dialog box displays incorrect information about the time you last checked for an update. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 2 build 22874.

Omit switch from command-line command to connect to virtual machine.
In the beta 1 releases, the command-line interface command to open a specified virtual machine on a remote host using the VMware Server Console should not include the -c switch. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 2 build 22874.

Issues resolved in VMware Server beta 3 build 23869

Some options not available in VM > Settings > Options > Advanced in VMware Server Console for Linux hosts.
In beta 2 build 22874, in the VMware Server Console for Linux hosts only, several options are not available when you go to VM > Settings > Options > Advanced. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Do not use GSX 3.x Virtual Machine Console for Linux on host or client with VMware Server Console.
In the beta 2 build 22874, The GSX 3.x Virtual Machine Console for Linux does not connect to a host running GSX server from a host or client machine that also has VMware Server Console installed. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Installing standalone GSX Virtual Machine Console on Windows host or client causes the VMware Server Console icon to disappear.
In the beta 2 build 22847, if you install a GSX Virtual Machine Console on a Windows host or client desktop that has VMware Server Console installed, the icon for VMware Server Console disappears. Only the icon for the GSX Virtual Machine Console appears on the desktop. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Do not enable auto-connect option on virtual machine USB device.
In the beta 2 build 22874, if you enable the Automatically connect new USB device to the virtual machine when in focus option, the USB device fails to connect to the guest operating system. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869. In build 23869, you can no longer configure a USB device to connect automatically to the virtual machine when it is in focus.

Opening a .xvm file from VMware Management Interface might fail to launch the VMware Server Console for the virtual machine.
In the beta 2 build 22874, the VMware Management Interface sometimes fails to launch the VMware Server Console when you attempt to open an .xvm file. To work around this issue in build 22874, download and open the .xvm file in a text editor and add either the -c or option to the file. For example, add -c to a file as follows: -h 196.168.25 -P 904 -u root -c
You should now be able to launch the VMware Server Console for the virtual machine from the VMware Management Interface. To correct this issue and not have to edit the .xvm file, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

VMware Management Interface might display message repeatedly.
In the beta 2 build 22874, when you go to Options > Virtual Machine Startup and Shutdown, you might immediately see a message notifying you that the virtual machine startup sequence has changed. The message does not indicate a problem with your configuration. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Full-screen mode not available; use quick-switch mode instead.
In the beta 2 build 22874, the full-screen mode feature in the VMware Server Console is not functioning properly. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

VMware Server Console does not display *.flp or *img files when editing virtual machine floppy disk.
In the beta 2 build 22874, the VMware Server Console does not display *.flp files when you go to VM > Settings > Hardware > Floppy, select Use Floppy Image, and click Browse. If you select Floppy Images (*.flp, *img) for Files of Type, *flp and *img files are not displayed even if such file types are available. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869. In build 23869, from the Files of Type drop-down list, you can select either Floppy files (*flp) to view *flp files or Image files (*img) to view *img files.

VMware Management Interface help page for verbose options displays page cannot be found message.
In the beta 2 build 22874, when you click Help from the Verbose Options page for a virtual machine, the help page is not available. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Guest OS UI of legacy virtual machine running Linux might not display properly.
In the beta 2 build 22874, when you use VMware Server to resume a legacy virtual machine running Linux, the user interface of the guest operating system might fail to display properly. This problem has been observed in legacy virtual machines running SuSE Linux and Red Hat Linux. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Two steps needed to switch between host and client DVD/CD-ROM drives.
In the beta 2 build 22874, to switch the virtual machine's DVD/CD-ROM drive from using the host's drive to using a client's drive, or vice versa, you must edit the settings twice. First, make the change from host to client or client to host and save the settings. Then return to the virtual machine settings editor to select the specific drive to use. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Virtual machine created using console on Linux host does not include USB controller device.
In the beta 1 builds 20925 and 22088, when you create a virtual machine using the VMware Server Console on a Linux host, it does not include a USB controller. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Querying virtual machine with a Server C API script about VMware Tools returns error.
In the beta 2 build 22874, if you use a Server C script to query a virtual machine's "VIX_PROPERTY_VM_TOOLS_STATE" property, the query returns the following error: VMX_E_UNRECOGNIZED_PROPERTY. You can ignore the error. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Do not use Server C API VIX_VM_Delete() function with option=0.
In the beta 2 build 22874, do not use the Server API VIX_VM_Delete() function with deleteOptions=0 to delete a virtual machine. The function either fails to delete the .vmx file or deletes the entire virtual machine directory. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Server C API VixHost_FindItems() function only finds virtual machines on the local host.
In the beta 2 build 22874, the VixHost_FindItems() function does not find virtual machines located on a remote host. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Server C API script might fail to retrieve snapshot of virtual machine that is powered on, powered off, or suspended.
In the beta 2 build 22874, when you use the following Server C API functions: VixVM_CreateSnapshot(), VixVM_RevertToSnapshot(), or VixVM_RemoveSnapshot() on a virtual machine that is powered on, powered off, or suspended, subsequent calls to VixVM_GetRootSnapshot() and VixVM_GetNumRootSnapshots() might fail. To correct this issue, upgrade to VMware Server beta 3 build 23869.

Known Issues

Virtual machine running Sun Microsystems Solaris 10 might fail to boot up.
In this release, a virtual machine running Sun Microsystems Solaris 10 might fail to boot up if it is not allocated enough memory. Make sure a virtual machine running Solaris 10 is allocated at least 256 MB. The recommended memory size is 512MB.

VMware Tools on 64-bit Solaris 10 guests runs in compatibility mode only; X drivers not included.
In this release, the 32-bit version of VMware Tools runs in compatibility mode on virtual machines running 64-bit Solaris 10. In addition, the version of VMware Tools included in this release does not include X drivers for 64-bit versions of Solaris 10. VMware Server beta 3 introduces experimental support to run all 64-bit versions of Solaris 10 as guest operating systems as well as VMware Tools support for Solaris 10. For more information on how to install and configure VMware Tools on a virtual machine running Solaris 10, go to the Using VMware Tools chapter of the VMware Server Virtual Machine Guide.

On virtual machine running 64-bit version of SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 beta 3 Xwindows fails to start up.
In this release, on a virtual machine running the 64-bit version of SuSE Linux ES 10 beta 3, Xwindows fails to start up whether or not VMware Tools is installed. This issue occurs because SLES 10 beta 3 does not properly detect the hardware during the installation process and creates an unusable xorg.conf file. To work around this issue, on the virtual machine run sax2-vesa so that the guest operating system runs in VESA mode and creates a valid .xorg.conf file. You can now run Xwindows. If VMware Tools is already installed, re-run the vmware-config-tools.pl script.

VMware Management Interface not supported on hosts running 64-bit Red Hat Linux Enterprise 3.0 or 64-bit SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 beta.
In this release, you cannot use the VMware Management Interface to connect to host machines running 64-bit versions of Red Hat Linux Enterprise 3.0 or 64-bit versions of SuSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 beta. You can use the VMware Management Interface to connect to host machines all other supported 64-bit versions of Linux and Microsoft Windows operating systems.

Repeated Keystrokes can occur on Linux virtual machines.
In this release, repeated keystrokes sometimes occur on virtual machines running Linux. To work around this issue, do not use console in the terminal window. Use rxvt or xterm instead. You can also try disabling software autorepeat in the virtual machine by using the following command: xset r off.

VMware Management Interface help page for setting the MIME type to launch console includes incorrect filename.
In this release, the help page in the VMware Management Interface that documents how to set the MIME type for a console installed from the Management Interface download incorrectly refers to the filename for the console as vmware-server-console. The correct name is vmware-server-console. To set the MIME type on a Linux host, include the following as the default path in the shell script: /usr/bin/vmware-server-console. For additional documentation on setting the MIME type, see Managing the Virtual Machines on the VMware Server Host chapter in the VMware Server Administration Guide.

Do not edit legacy virtual machine on a network drive using VMware Server Console on a remote client.
In this release, you cannot edit a legacy virtual machine located on a network drive using the VMware Server Console from a remote client. To work around this issue, use a remote desktop (RDP) client to connect to the host and use the VMware Server Console on the local host to edit the legacy virtual machines.

Closing the Home tab on a VMware Server Console for Linux host closes connection to server.
When using a VMware Server Console to connect either remotely or locally to a Linux host, closing the Home tab ends the connection to the server and all open session windows, such as to virtual machines, close.

Snapshots disabled in clustered virtual machines.
In this release, if you use VMware Server virtual machines in a cluster, the ability to take and revert to snapshots is disabled in the virtual machines that are members of the cluster.

Unable to create virtual disk on a mapped network drive.
In this release, you cannot create a virtual disk on a mapped network drive on a Windows host. When you attempt to do so, the console displays an error message that includes the following phrase: The specified network password is not correct.

Do not use Fit Guest to Window option with Mandriva Linux 2006 guests.
In this release, if you enable the Fit Guest to Window option for virtual machine running Mandriva Linux 2006, the screen becomes corrupted. This issue occurs if the version of Mandriva Linux 2006 you are running includes version 6.8.99 of the X.org XWindow System. To work around this issue, upgrade to X.org version 6.9. For more information, consult the documentation included with your distribution of Mandriva Linux 2006.

Do not mix components of VMware Server and VMware ESX Server.
You cannot use the VMware Virtual Machine Console from a VMware ESX Server host to connect to a VMware Server host, or the VMware Server Console to connect to an ESX Server host.

Error message when attempting to use GSX Server console is not informative.
You cannot use the VMware Virtual Machine Console from a GSX Server host to connect to a virtual machine running on a VMware Server system. In this release, the error message that appears does not explain that this is the reason for the connection failure. To connect to VMware Server, install the version of the VMware Server Console that is available from the VMware Management Interface in VMware Server.

Sound driver needed for 64-bit Windows guest operating systems.
With this release, if you want to use sound in a 64-bit Windows guest operating system, you must use the driver available on the VMware Web site at www.vmware.com/download/ws/#drivers under VMaudio Driver (experimental).

VMware Management Interface log on might fail on some 64-bit Windows Server 2003 hosts.
If you are running VMware Server on a 64-bit Windows Server 2003 host, you might not be able to log on to the VMware Management Interface. This appears to be a rare problem. If you encounter it, file a support request and include the output from the vm-support script. Use of this script is described in the VMware GSX Server documentation.

Creation of a new folder on a remote host might fail without warning.
In this release, if you attempt to create a new folder on a remote Linux host from the VMware Server Console using File > Open virtual machine > Browse > New Folder, the new folder might not be created. To work around the problem, create the new folder directly on the host computer.

Some command line switches do not work correctly.
Some command line switches do not work correctly in this release. You should not use the -q or -X switch with this release.

Grab on keypress might interfere with typing in dialog boxes.
If you set input preferences (Edit > Preferences > Input) to Grab keyboard and mouse input on key press, you might be unable to enter text in some VMware Server dialog boxes. To work around this problem, use a different input preferences setting. This issue occurs only on Windows hosts.

Turn off disk caching for clustered virtual machines.
In this release, if you use VMware Server virtual machines in a cluster, you must turn off disk caching for each virtual machine that is a member of the cluster. If you do not turn off disk clustering, data on the shared drive may be corrupted. To turn off disk caching, open the configuration .vmx file of each virtual machine in a text editor and add the following line:
diskLib.dataCacheMaxSize = "0"
If you encounter problems of any kind when testing clustered virtual machines, please file a support request.

Administrator can delete private virtual machine created by normal users.
In this release, if a normal user creates a private virtual machine, a local or domain administrator is able to use the VMware Server Console to delete the virtual machine's files from disk. If you are running the console as an administrator, be careful not to delete a virtual machine's files by mistake.

Client DVD/CD-ROM drive can be used only for data discs.
When you use the VMware Server Console on a client machine to connect to a virtual machine running on a VMware Server system, you have the option of using the client machine's DVD/CD-ROM drive with the virtual machine. This can be a convenient way of transferring data to a virtual machine — for example, when you are installing an operating system or other software in the virtual machine. Note that you cannot use the client machine's DVD/CD-ROM drive to play music or videos in the virtual machine.

Connect DVD/CD-ROM drive on client machine to virtual machine manually.
In this release, If you use the DVD/CD-ROM drive on a client machine, you must connect the drive to the virtual machine manually after you power on the virtual machine. You cannot set the client's drive to connect automatically when the virtual machine starts.

Use 32-bit VMware vmCOM API on 64-bit Microsoft Windows guest operating system.
In this release, only a 32-bit version of the VMware vmCOM API is available, but it also supports 64-bit Microsoft Windows guest operating systems. You must, however, use a 32-bit version of either the Windows command-line window or the cscript to run the vmCOM API. Using the default 64-bit version of the command-line window to run a script, returns an error. You can typically find the 32-bit version of the Windows command-line executable in < windows >\SysWOW64\cmd.exe, and the 32-bit version of cscript in < windows >\SysWOW64\cscript.exe.

Do not use the Server C API with legacy virtual machines.
VMware recommends that you not use the Server C API with legacy virtual machines. Upgrade any legacy virtual machines you want to use on VMware Server before using the Server C API to manage these virtual machines. To upgrade a virtual machine, use the VMware Server Console and choose VM > Upgrade Virtual Machine.

Server C API VixHost_FindItems() returns lowercase path names for virtual machines on Windows hosts.
When you use the VixHost_FindItems() function to locate running virtual machines on a Windows host, the path names are returned in lowercase letters. This is not a problem, because Windows does not consider case when working with path names. On Linux hosts, path names are returned in mixed case, exactly as they appear in the file system.

Server C API function VixVM_LoginGuest() with Linux virtual machines returns error.
If you use the function VixVM_LoginGuest() with a Linux virtual machine, it returns the following error: VIX_E_GUEST_USER_PERMISSIONS. To work around this issue, modify the VMware Tools configuration file on the host machine. The default location of the file is /etc/vmware-tools/tools.conf.
Open the tools.conf file with a text editor and make the following settings:
allowGuestOps = "TRUE"
guestOpsUserName = "< username >"
where username is the user account in the guest operating system.
This issue applies only to Linux guest operating systems. Windows guest operating systems complete the login operation normally.

Do no use symbolic path link names in the Server C API.
The Server C API does not follow symbolic links in path names. If you use the Server C API to open a virtual machine that the console references with a symbolic link, use the original path name in the API instead of the symbolic link.

Server C API function VM_InstallTools() might hang when installing VMware Tools in Windows guests.
If you call the VixVM_InstallTools() function for a virtual machine with a Windows guest operating system, the installation might hang when the VMware Tools installer displays a dialog box in the guest. To work around this problem, use a console to connect to the virtual machine and click through the installer in the guest.

Using Server C API to copy files between the host and guest does not work remotely.
The Server C functions VixVM_CopyFileFromHostToGuest() and VixVM_CopyFileFromGuestToHost() can copy files in and out of virtual machines only when the client is running on the same host as the virtual machine. You can open a virtual machine on another host, but you cannot use the file copy functions in that situation.

Server C API might not show current value for virtual machine power state.
When you call GetProperties() to examine the VIX_PROPERTY_VM_POWER_STATE property, the value might not immediately show the result of a recent change in the virtual machine's power state. Instead, the value shows the previous power state. For example, after you power off a virtual machine, the Vix_GetProperties() might continue to report for a brief time that the power state of the virtual machine is VIX_POWERSTATE_POWERED_ON.
If your client application depends on checking the power state, delay several seconds after a power state change before checking the value of the VIX_PROPERTY_VM_POWER_STATE property.

Server C API function WaitForToolsInGuest() fails.
The function WaitForToolsInGuest() should block until the VMware Tools suite is running in the guest operating system, and report success if VMware Tools is installed. If VMware Tools is not installed, WaitForToolsInGuest() should time out and report an error. In this beta release, WaitForToolsInGuest() succeeds only if the VMware Tools suite is already running when WaitForToolsInGuest() is called. If you call WaitForToolsInGuest() before VMware Tools is ready, WaitForToolsInGuest() times out but reports VIX_OK. This affects other functions, such as VixVM_RunProgramInGuest(), that depend on VMware Tools to be fully operational.
To work around this issue, power on the virtual machine and observe in the console application until the VMware Tools icon is displayed in the guest operating system.

Server C API reports error when resuming a virtual machine.
The function VixVM_PowerOn() is used to resume a suspended virtual machine. If a client calls VixVM_PowerOn() for a virtual machine that was previously suspended with a call to VixVM_Suspend() in the same client session, the VixVM_PowerOn() function results in the error E_VM_NOT_RUNNING.
To work around this issue, call VixVM_PowerOn() in a separate client session.

Server C API function CreateSnapshot() might fail when called for a suspended virtual machine.
The Server C API lets you take a snapshot of a virtual machine in any power state. However, a virtual machine in a suspended state might fail to take a snapshot. The function CreateSnapshot() incorrectly returns E_VM_NOT_RUNNING. If the call succeeds, the snapshot might subsequently be reported as invalid. If you experience any of these issues, try the CreateSnapshot() call again.

Server C API function CreateSnapshot()might fail when called for a running virtual machine
The Server C API lets you take a snapshot of a virtual machine in any power state. However, a virtual machine in a powered-on state might fail to take a snapshot. The function CreateSnapshot() reports success, but the snapshot might subsequently be reported as invalid. If you experience this issue, try the CreateSnapshot() call again.

Server C API cannot power off a virtual machine after reverting to a snapshot taken while the virtual machine was running.
If a client reverts a virtual machine to a snapshot taken while the virtual machine was running, the function VixVM_PowerOff() subsequently fails. This function reports success, but the virtual machine continues to run.
To work around this issue, take snapshots only while a virtual machine is suspended or powered off.

Server C API cannot revert to snapshot while virtual machine is running.
Sometimes the function VixVM_RevertToSnapshot() hangs if you call it while the virtual machine is running. To work around this issue, power off a virtual machine before calling VixVM_RevertToSnapshot().

Server C API function VixHost_Connect() requires host name, user name, and password parameters.
The VixHost_Connect() function currently requires the user to provide values for the parameters hostName, userName, and password. This is true even for a localhost connection. For this beta release, disregard the use of null values in the examples.