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VMware Workstation 3.2

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Adding Drives to a Virtual Machine

Adding Drives to a Virtual Machine

VMware Workstation virtual machines can use up to four IDE devices and up to seven SCSI devices. Any of these devices can be a virtual hard disk or DVD or CD-ROM drive. A virtual machine can read data from a DVD-ROM disc. VMware Workstation does not support playing DVD movies in a virtual machine.

Many other SCSI devices can be connected to a virtual machine using the host operating system's generic SCSI driver. For details on connecting these devices, see Connecting to a Generic SCSI Device.

Adding Virtual Disks to a Virtual Machine

Adding Virtual Disks to a Virtual Machine

Virtual disks are stored as files on the host computer or on a network file server, so it does not matter whether the disk that holds the files is IDE or SCSI. A virtual IDE drive can be stored on an IDE drive or on a SCSI drive. So can a virtual SCSI drive.

Windows Host

Windows Host

Use the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor) to add a new virtual disk to your virtual machine. The virtual machine should be powered off before you begin. If it is not, shut down the guest operating system normally, then click Power Off on the VMware Workstation toolbar.

Note: If you have a Windows NT 4.0 guest with a SCSI virtual disk, you cannot add both an additional SCSI disk and an IDE disk to the configuration.

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor) and click Add. The Add Hardware Wizard guides you through the steps to create your virtual disk.

  2. Click Hard Disk, then click Next.

  3. Select Create a New Virtual Disk, then click Next.

  4. Set the capacity for the new virtual disk.

    Note: The virtual disk's files start small and grow as needed, but they can never grow larger than the size you set here. You can set a size between 2GB and 256GB for a SCSI virtual disk or 128GB for an IDE virtual disk. The default is 4GB.

  5. Accept the default filename and location for the virtual disk file or change it, if you want to use a different name or location. To find a different folder, click Browse.

    In most cases, the wizard creates a SCSI virtual disk by default. If your guest operating system does not have appropriate support for the virtual SCSI adapter in the virtual machine, the wizard creates an IDE virtual disk. If you want your virtual disk to be an IDE device, click Advanced and be sure the virtual device node is set to an available IDE node.

    When you have set the filename and location you want to use and made any selections you want to make on the advanced settings screen, click Finish.

  6. The wizard creates the new virtual disk. It appears to your guest operating system as a new, blank hard disk. Use the guest operating system's tools to partition and format the new drive for use.

    The new virtual disk is set up in persistent mode. To change to nonpersistent or undoable mode, use the Configuration Editor. Click the entry for the new virtual disk, then select the mode you want.

    If the virtual disk files are stored on a network file server, you can improve performance of the virtual disk by setting the folder for a disk in undoable mode to a location on the host computer. You can make this setting on the Options tab of the Configuration Editor.

Linux Host

Linux Host

Use the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor) to add a new virtual disk to your virtual machine. The virtual machine should be powered off before you begin. If it is not, shut down the guest operating system normally, then click Power Off on the VMware Workstation toolbar.

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor). If you want to add a SCSI virtual disk, click the + sign beside SCSI Devices. If you want to add an IDE virtual disk, click the + sign beside IDE Drives.

    Note: All virtual machines can use IDE virtual disks. SCSI virtual disks can be used with guest operating systems that have drivers for the virtual BusLogic SCSI adapter used in the virtual machine. To use SCSI disks in a Windows XP or Windows .NET Server virtual machine, you need a special SCSI driver available from the download section of the VMware Web site at www.vmware.com/download. Follow the instructions on the Web site to use the driver with a fresh installation of Windows XP or Windows .NET Server.

  2. Click a device that is shown as Not Installed.

  3. Use the default device type of Virtual Disk.

  4. Keep the default mode of Persistent or use the drop-down list to change the setting to Undoable or Nonpersistent.

  5. Type the name for the virtual disk's first file. By default, it is created in the same directory as the virtual machine's configuration file. To create it in a different directory, type the full path name or click Choose to navigate to the directory you want to use.

  6. Set the capacity for the new virtual disk.

    Note: The virtual disk's files start small and grow as needed, but they can never grow larger than the size you set here. You can set a size between 2000 (2GB) and 64000 (64GB). The default is 4000 (4GB).

  7. If you want to disable write caching on this disk, click the check box beside Disable Write Caching.

    When write caching is enabled, there is a delay between the time a program saves data and the time that data is actually written to disk. This improves performance. But the delay in writing data to disk adds some risk of data loss. Thus if data integrity is more important than performance, you may want to disable write caching.

  8. Click Create to create the files for your new virtual disk.

  9. Click Install to install the new virtual disk in your virtual machine.

  10. Click OK to save the configuration and close the Configuration Editor.

    The new virtual disk appears to your guest operating system as a new, blank hard disk. Use the guest operating system's tools to partition and format the new drive for use.

    If the virtual disk files are stored on a network file server, you can improve performance of the virtual disk by setting the redo log directory to a location on the host computer. You can make this setting in the Misc panel of the Configuration Editor.

Adding Raw Disks to a Virtual Machine

Adding Raw Disks to a Virtual Machine

Windows Host

Windows Host

Use the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor) to add a new raw disk to your virtual machine. The virtual machine should be powered off before you begin. If it is not, shut down the guest operating system normally, then click Power Off on the VMware Workstation toolbar.

Caution: Raw disks are an advanced feature and should be configured only by expert users.

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor) and click Add. The Add Hardware Wizard guides you through the steps to create your virtual disk.

  2. Click Hard Disk, then click Next.

  3. Select Use a physical disk, then click Next.

  4. Choose the physical hard disk to use from the drop-down list. Click Next.

  5. Set the virtual machine's access rights for each partition on the physical hard disk.

    • Select Hide if the virtual machine should not see the partition.
    • Select Read to give the virtual machine read-only access to the partition.
    • Select Write to give the virtual machine read/write access to the partition.

      Click Next.

  6. Accept the default filename and location for the file that stores access information for this raw disk - or change it, if you want to use a different name or location. To find a different directory, click Browse.

    When you have set the filename and location you want to use and made any selections you want to make on the advanced settings screen, click Finish.

  7. The wizard configures the new raw disk. If the partitions used on the raw disk are not formatted for your guest operating system, use the guest operating system's tools to format them.

    The new raw disk is set up in persistent mode. To change to nonpersistent or undoable mode, use the Configuration Editor. Click the entry for the new raw disk, then select the mode you want.

Linux Host

Linux Host

Use the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor) to add a new raw disk to your virtual machine. The virtual machine should be powered off before you begin. If it is not, shut down the guest operating system normally, then click Power Off on the VMware Workstation toolbar.

Caution: Raw disks are an advanced feature and should be configured only by expert users.

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor). If you want to add a SCSI raw disk, click the + sign beside SCSI Devices. If you want to add an IDE raw disk, click the + sign beside IDE Drives.

  2. Click a device that is shown as Not Installed.

  3. Choose Raw Disk from the Device Type drop-down list.

  4. Keep the default mode of Persistent or use the drop-down list to change the setting to Undoable or Nonpersistent.

  5. Type the name for the file that will store access information for this raw disk. To create it in a different directory, type the full path name or click Choose to navigate to the directory you want to use.

  6. If you want to disable write caching on this disk, click the check box beside Disable write caching.

    When write caching is enabled, there is a delay between the time a program saves data and the time that data is actually written to disk. This improves performance. But the delay in writing data to disk adds some risk of data loss. Thus if data integrity is more important than performance, you may want to disable write caching.

  7. Click Create to create the file for your new raw disk.

  8. A dialog box prompts you for the name of the device that holds the partition you want to use as a raw disk. Enter the path to the device - for example
    /dev/hdb - then click OK.

  9. A dialog box prompts you to set access permissions for the partitions on the device you have selected.

    • Select No Access if the virtual machine should not see the partition.
    • Select Read Only to give the virtual machine read-only access to the partition.
    • Select Read/Write to give the virtual machine read/write access to the partition.

      Click Save to save your selections and close the dialog box.

  10. Click Install to install the new raw disk in your virtual machine.

  11. Click OK to save the configuration and close the Configuration Editor.

  12. If the partitions used on the raw disk are not formatted for your guest operating system, use the guest operating system's tools to format them.

Adding DVD or CD-ROM Drives to a Virtual Machine

Adding DVD or CD-ROM Drives to a Virtual Machine

You can add one or more DVD or CD-ROM drives to your virtual machine. You can connect the virtual machine's drive to a physical drive on the host machine or to an ISO image file.

You can configure the virtual DVD or CD-ROM drive as either IDE or SCSI, no matter what kind of physical drive you connect it to. In other words, if your host computer has an IDE CD-ROM drive, you can set up the virtual machine's drive as either SCSI or IDE and connect it to the host's drive. The same is true if the host's physical drive is a SCSI drive.

The DVD or CD-ROM drives in the virtual machine can be used to read data from CD-ROM or DVD-ROM disks. VMware Workstation does not support playing DVD movies in a virtual machine.

If you need to read from multisession discs, configure your DVD/CD-ROM drive to use raw access mode.

Adding a DVD or CD-ROM Drive on a Windows Host

Adding a DVD or CD-ROM Drive on a Windows Host

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor) and click Add to start the Add Hardware Wizard.

  2. Click DVD/CD-ROM Drive, then click Next.

  3. Select Use physical drive if you want to connect the virtual machine's drive to a physical drive on the host computer. Select Use ISO Image if you want to connect the virtual machine's drive to an ISO image file.

  4. Do one of the following:

    • If you selected Use physical drive, choose the drive you want to use from the drop-down list, then click Finish.
    • If you selected Use ISO Image, enter the path and filename for the image file or click Browse to navigate to the file. Then click Finish.
  5. The drive is set up initially so it appears to the guest operating system as an IDE drive. If you want to change so it appears to the guest operating system as a SCSI drive, click the drive's entry in the Configuration Editor and make that change in the settings panel on the right.

Adding a DVD or CD-ROM Drive on a Linux Host

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor). If you want the drive to appear to the guest operating system as a SCSI drive, click the + sign beside SCSI Devices. If you want the drive to appear to the guest operating system as an IDE drive, click the + sign beside IDE Drives.

  2. Select a device that is shown as Not Installed.

  3. From the Device Type drop-down list, choose CD-ROM to connect to a physical DVD or CD-ROM drive. Choose CD-ROM Image to connect to an ISO image file.

  4. If you are connecting to a physical drive, enter its device name (for example,
    /dev/hdc) in the Name field or click Choose to navigate to the name.

    If you are connecting to an ISO image file, enter the path and filename in the Name field or click Choose to navigate to the name.

  5. Click Install to create the new DVD or CD-ROM drive, then click OK to save the configuration and close the Configuration Editor.

Adding Floppy Drives to a Virtual Machine

Adding Floppy Drives to a Virtual Machine

You can add floppy drives to your virtual machine, to a total of two floppy drives. A virtual floppy drive can connect to a physical floppy drive on the host computer, to an existing floppy image file or to a blank floppy image file.

Adding a Floppy Drive on a Windows Host

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor) and click Add to start the Add Hardware Wizard.

  2. Click Floppy Drive, then click Next.

  3. Select what you want to connect to - a physical floppy drive on the host computer, an existing floppy image file or a new floppy image file. Click Next.

  4. If you selected Use a physical floppy drive, choose the drive's letter from the drop-down list, then click Finish.

    If you selected Use a floppy image, type the path and filename for the floppy image file you want to use or click Browse to navigate to the file. Click Finish.

    If you selected Create a blank floppy image, use the default path and filename or type in a new one. To navigate to a location, click Browse. When the field contains the path and filename you want to use for the new floppy image file, click Finish.

Adding a Floppy Drive on a Linux Host

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor). Click the + sign beside Floppy Drives.

  2. Select a device that is shown as Not Installed.

  3. On the Type drop-down list, choose Device to connect to a physical floppy drive on the host computer.

    Choose File from the drop-down list to connect to a floppy image file.

  4. If you chose Device, accept the default device name shown (for example,
    /dev/fd1 for the second physical floppy drive), type in the path and device name or click Choose to navigate to the device name.

    If you chose File, type in the path and filename for the floppy image file or click Choose to navigate to the file.

  5. Click Install to install the new floppy drive, then click OK to save the configuration and close the Configuration Editor.

Connecting a CD-ROM or Floppy Drive to an Image File

Connecting a CD-ROM or Floppy Drive to an Image File

You can use the Configuration Editor to connect an existing virtual CD-ROM or floppy drive to an image file.

You can connect a virtual CD-ROM drive to an ISO image file.

Connecting to an ISO Image File on a Windows Host

Connecting to an ISO Image File on a Windows Host

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor) and select the DVD/CD-ROM drive you want to connect to the image file.

  2. Select Use ISO Image and enter the path and filename for the image file or click Browse to navigate to the file.

  3. Click OK to save the configuration and close the Configuration Editor.

Connecting to an ISO Image File on a Linux Host

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor). If your DVD/CD-ROM drive is configured as a SCSI drive, click the + sign beside SCSI Devices. If it is configured as an IDE drive, click the + sign beside IDE Drives.

  2. Select the DVD/CD-ROM drive you want to connect to the image file and enter the path and filename in the Name field or click Choose to navigate to the name.

  3. Click OK to save the configuration and close the Configuration Editor.

Connecting to a Floppy Image File on a Windows Host

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor) and select the floppy drive you want to connect to an image file.

  2. Type the path and filename for the floppy image file you want to use or click Browse to navigate to the file.

    If you want to create a new image file, click Create. Use the default filename and folder or change them as you wish.

  3. Click Finish.

Connecting to a Floppy Image File on a Linux Host

  1. Open the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor). Click the + sign beside Floppy Drives.

  2. Select the device you want to use.

  3. On the Type drop-down list, choose File.

  4. Type in the path and filename for the floppy image file or click Choose to navigate to the file.

  5. Click OK to save the configuration and close the Configuration Editor.

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