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VMware Workstation 3.2

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Upgrading on a Windows Host

Upgrading on a Windows Host

Upgrading from Version 2.0, 3.0 or 3.1 to 3.2

Upgrading from Version 2.0, 3.0 or 3.1 to 3.2

The Upgrade Process

The Upgrade Process

In most cases, upgrading from version 2.0, 3.0 or 3.1 is a four-step process. If you are upgrading from Workstation 2.0 on a Windows 2000 host that has host-only networking, there is an additional step. See Upgrading on a Windows 2000 Host with Host-Only Networking below for details.

  1. Uninstall the version now installed on your computer.

  2. Reboot your computer.

  3. Install version 3.2.

  4. Reboot your computer.

Removing Version 2.0

Removing Version 2.0

To uninstall version 2.0, use the VMware Workstation uninstaller.

  1. Launch the uninstaller.
    Start > Programs > VMware > VMware for Windows NT Uninstallation

  2. Click Yes.

  3. Follow the on-screen instructions. You may safely keep your existing licence in the Windows registry.

After you reboot, follow the instructions in Installing VMware Workstation 3.2 on a Windows Host.

Removing Version 3.0 or 3.1

Removing Version 3.0 or 3.1

To uninstall version 3.0 or 3.1, use the VMware Workstation uninstaller.

  1. Launch the uninstaller.
    Start > Programs > VMware > VMware Workstation Uninstallation

  2. Click Yes.

  3. Follow the on-screen instructions. You may safely keep your existing licence in the Windows registry.

After you reboot, follow the instructions in Installing VMware Workstation 3.2 on a Windows Host.

Upgrading on a Windows 2000 Host with Host-Only Networking

Upgrading on a Windows 2000 Host with Host-Only Networking

If you have set up host-only networking for VMware Workstation 2.0 on a Windows 2000 host, the upgrade process has five steps.

  1. Uninstall your host-only adapter (or adapters).

    1. On the host computer, start the Add/Remove Hardware Wizard.
      Start > Settings > Control Panel > Add/Remove Hardware
      Click Next.
    2. Select Uninstall/Unplug a Device. Click Next.
    3. Select Uninstall a Device. Click Next.
    4. Select VMware Virtual Ethernet Adapter, then follow the wizard's instructions.

      If you have more than one host-only adapter, repeat these steps for each of them.

  2. Uninstall version 2.0.

  3. Reboot your computer.

  4. Install version 3.2.

  5. Reboot your computer.

Using Virtual Machines Created with Version 2.0 under Version 3.2

Using Virtual Machines Created with Version 2.0 under Version 3.2

There are, broadly speaking, three approaches you can take to setting up virtual machines under VMware Workstation 3.2. Choose one of these approaches. There are no issues using virtual machines created under VMware Workstation 3.0 or 3.1.

  • Create everything new from the start. Use the New Virtual Machine Wizard to set up a new virtual machine and install a guest operating system in the virtual machine as described in Creating a New Virtual Machine. If you set up your virtual machines in this way, you will be using the latest technology and will enjoy the best possible virtual machine performance.
  • Use an existing configuration file (.vmx) and virtual disk (.dsk if you do not convert to new filenames when you install VMware Workstation or .vmdk if you do convert).

    Upgrade VMware Tools to the new version following the instructions for your guest operating system in Installing VMware Tools. You should not remove the older version of VMware Tools before installing the new version.

    A virtual machine set up in this way should run without problems. However, you will not have the benefits of certain new features. You will not have USB ports. You will not have the new BIOS, which makes it easier to use one of the operating systems on a dual-boot host machine as a guest operating system in a virtual machine. Also, you will not have the new unified virtual video hardware, which helps simplify the installation of VMware Tools.

    Note: On Windows hosts, VMware Workstation 3.2 offers to convert virtual disk .dsk filenames to use the new .vmdk extension at the time you install VMware Workstation. If you are storing virtual disk files on a Windows XP or Windows .NET Server host, it is especially important that you allow VMware Workstation to make this change in order to avoid conflicts with the Windows XP or Windows .NET Server System Restore feature. The .vmdk extension can be used for virtual disks under any VMware product. VMware Workstation 3.2 automatically updates references to the virtual disk files in configuration files on the host computer. If you are using the same virtual disk file from any other computer, you need to update the configuration files with the new filename. For details, see Updating Filenames for Virtual Disks Created with Earlier VMware Products.

  • Use an existing virtual machine and upgrade the virtual hardware. This gives you access to new features, but the process is one-way - you cannot reverse it.

    Start by using an existing configuration file (.vmx) and virtual disk (.dsk if you do not convert to new filenames when you install VMware Workstation or .vmdk if you do convert).

    Upgrade VMware Tools to the new version following the instructions for your guest operating system in Installing VMware Tools. You should not remove the older version of VMware Tools before installing the new version.

    Upgrade the virtual hardware so you can use USB devices in your virtual machine.

    Note: On Windows hosts, VMware Workstation 3.2 offers to convert virtual disk .dsk filenames to use the new .vmdk extension at the time you install VMware Workstation. If you are storing virtual disk files on a Windows XP or Windows .NET Server host, it is especially important that you allow VMware Workstation to make this change in order to avoid conflicts with the Windows XP or Windows .NET Server System Restore feature. The .vmdk extension can be used for virtual disks under any VMware product. VMware Workstation 3.2 automatically updates references to the virtual disk files in configuration files on the host computer. If you are using the same virtual disk file from any other computer, you need to update the configuration files with the new filename. For details, see Updating Filenames for Virtual Disks Created with Earlier VMware Products.

Upgrading the Virtual Hardware in an Existing Virtual Machine

Upgrading the Virtual Hardware in an Existing Virtual Machine

On the Settings menu, choose Upgrade Virtual Hardware. A dialog box appears, warning that the upgrade process cannot be reversed. Click Yes to continue, then follow the directions.

Virtual hardware upgrade is irreversible: The process of upgrading the virtual hardware is irreversible and makes the disks attached to this virtual machine incompatible with VMware Workstation 2.0. You should make backup copies of your virtual disks before starting the upgrade.

If you are using a Windows 95, Windows 98 or Windows Me virtual machine created under VMware Workstation 2.0 and choose to upgrade the virtual hardware, you need to take several steps to be sure the new virtual hardware is recognized properly by the guest operating system. With other guest operating systems, these special steps are not needed.

Before you upgrade the virtual hardware, make sure you have installed the latest version of VMware Tools, including the SVGA driver, then power off your virtual machine.

Take the steps listed under the name of your guest operating system.

Windows Me Guest

Windows Me Guest

  1. Choose Settings > Upgrade Virtual Hardware.

  2. A warning message appears. It says: "This operation will cause the virtual hardware your guest operating system runs on to change"

    Click Yes.

  3. Click Power On.

  4. Click OK to dismiss the message "A legacy SVGA driver has been detected."

  5. Several Plug and Play messages appear. You can safely ignore them.

  6. Log on to Windows Me. More Plug and Play messages are displayed. One refers to the VMware SVGA driver.

    Click Yes to restart your computer.

  7. Log on to Windows Me. The SVGA driver is not working properly.

  8. From the Windows Start menu, choose Settings > Control Panel > System > Device Manager > Display Adapters.

    Manually remove the two SVGA drivers.

  9. Restart Windows Me.

    A VMware SVGA II adapter is detected and Windows installs it.

    Windows notifies you to restart your computer.

    Click Yes.

  10. The SVGA driver should be working correctly.

Windows 98 Guest

Windows 98 Guest

  1. Choose Settings > Upgrade Virtual Hardware.

  2. A warning message appears. It says: "This operation will cause the virtual hardware your guest operating system runs on to change"

    Click Yes.

  3. Click Power On.

  4. Click OK to dismiss the message "A legacy SVGA driver has been detected."

  5. Log on to Windows 98. You see a number of Plug and Play messages. You may need to insert your Windows 98 installation CD.

  6. A blue screen appears. Press any key to dismiss the blue screen.

  7. Click Reset to restart the virtual machine (because it is not responding).

  8. Click OK to dismiss the message "A legacy SVGA driver has been detected."

    Again, you see a number of Plug and Play messages.

    Windows notifies you to restart Windows.

    Click Yes.

  9. Log on to Windows 98. The SVGA driver is not working properly.

  10. From the Windows Start menu, choose Settings > Control Panel > System > Device Manager > Display Adapters.

    Manually remove the two conflicting SVGA drivers.

  11. Restart Windows 98.

    A VMware SVGA II adapter is detected and Windows installs it.

  12. Restart Windows 98.

  13. The SVGA driver should be working correctly.

Windows 95 Guest

Windows 95 Guest

  1. Choose Settings > Upgrade Virtual Hardware.

  2. A warning message appears. It says: "This operation will cause the virtual hardware your guest operating system runs on to change"

    Click Yes.

  3. Click Power On.

  4. Click OK to dismiss the message "A legacy SVGA driver has been detected."

  5. Log on to Windows 95.

    You see a number of Plug and Play messages. Click Cancel for the following devices: Standard host CPU bridge, PCI bridge and PCI Universal bus.

  6. The SVGA driver is not working properly.

  7. From the Windows Start menu, choose Settings > Control Panel > System > Device Manager > Display Adapters.

    Manually remove the SVGA driver.

  8. Restart Windows 95.

  9. Again, you see a number of Plug and Play messages. Click Cancel for the following devices: Standard host CPU bridge, PCI bridge and PCI Universal bus.

  10. A VMware SVGA II adapter is detected and Windows installs it.

  11. Restart Windows 95.

  12. Once again, you see a number of Plug and Play messages. Again, click Cancel for the following devices: Standard host CPU bridge, PCI bridge and PCI Universal bus.

  13. The SVGA driver should be working correctly.

Check Guest Operating System Selection

Check Guest Operating System Selection

If your guest operating system is Windows 2000, update the setting in the Configuration Editor (Settings > Configuration Editor > Options) to reflect the specific version of Windows 2000 you are running.

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